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Overview

Five areas of student growth—wellbeing, connectedness, awareness, agency, and mastery—suggest students are growing as leaders of a better future.  Mastery is not diluted but is enhanced when pursued with other outcomes.

The part of the TACL framework with the overlapping silhouettes of three children jumping playfully is in blue, while the rest is in grayscale. The text in the center on top of the silhouettes says in order from top to bottom: “WELLBEING,” “CONNECTEDNESS,” “AWARENESS,” “AGENCY,” and “MASTERY” in yellow.

Discover

What is student leadership and why does it matter?

In this compilation video, you will hear and see examples of student leadership. What inferences can you make about what these students and their teachers value?

Learn

Five student leadership outcomes

Students and teachers in transformational classrooms around the world value similar areas of growth as indicators of student leadership development. Our crowd-sourced studies are suggesting that rigorous mastery is achieved through, not at the expense of, other key outcomes, including wellbeing, connectedness, awareness, and agency.

WELLBEING

Students feel secure and loved, empowering them to be themselves, try new things, and make mistakes in ways that encourage deeper learning.

CONNECTEDNESS

Students seek and value the perspectives and experiences of others as they work collaboratively toward a common good.

AWARENESS

Students are aware of inequity and celebrate their and others’ unique strengths and identities as assets for navigating challenges in pursuit of their growing sense of purpose.

AGENCY

Students take independent or collective action toward shared goals to cause positive changes in their own life or the lives of others.

MASTERY

Students attain a higher-order command of knowledge and skills as a means to create new opportunities and solutions to challenges.

Learn

Five student leadership outcomes

Students and teachers in transformational classrooms around the world value similar areas of growth as indicators of student leadership development. Our crowd-sourced studies are suggesting that rigorous mastery is achieved through, not at the expense of, other key outcomes, including wellbeing, connectedness, awareness, and agency.

WELLBEING

Students feel secure and loved, empowering them to be themselves, try new things, and make mistakes in ways that encourage deeper learning.

CONNECTEDNESS

Students seek and value the perspectives and experiences of others as they work collaboratively toward a common good.

AWARENESS

Students are aware of inequity and celebrate their and others’ unique strengths and identities as assets for navigating challenges in pursuit of their growing sense of purpose.

AGENCY

Students take independent or collective action toward shared goals to cause positive changes in their own life or the lives of others.

MASTERY

Students attain a higher-order command of knowledge and skills as a means to create new opportunities and solutions to challenges.

“We have to develop that critical authentic hope in young people that tells them that you can make change, and we’re all in this together. And so our curriculum is built around that idea, understanding how society works, how you play that game and change that game, and what skills you need in order to do that.”

— Ann Milne, Former School Principal, Education Consultant, Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit, and Cultural Learning Pioneer

Image
Portrait shot of Ann Milne, a woman with short hair wearing glasses. She is looking at the camera and smiling.

“We have to develop that critical authentic hope in young people that tells them that you can make change, and we’re all in this together. And so our curriculum is built around that idea, understanding how society works, how you play that game and change that game, and what skills you need in order to do that."

— Ann Milne, Former School Principal, Education Consultant, Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit, and Cultural Learning Pioneer

Image
Portrait shot of Ann Milne, a woman with short hair wearing glasses. She is looking at the camera and smiling.

Do

Explore our global library of tools for measuring student outcomes and other recommended resources:

30 resource(s)
TACL
Why Student Leadership Matters
Video Lens Outcome Students as Leaders
TACL
Samia Habli Creating Healing Spaces
Video Outcome Strategy Awareness Love & Connect
TACL
Student Leadership Measurement Library: Connectedness
Teaching / Lesson Plan Outcome Connectedness
TACL
Find your light: Exploring an excellent education through Maya
Video Outcome

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Our Glossary

In our attempt to capture the real spirit of the classrooms we have studied, we have sometimes intentionally used words and phrases in a slightly unusual way. 

We invite you to learn more about our language choices by exploring our Glossary.